National Masonry Instructors Association

P.O. Box 669
Stevensville, MD 21666
Phone: 443-496-0132       Cell: 803-308-0931
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Quality Control Technician

Apply engineering theory and principles to problems of layout or production, usually under the direction of engineering staff. May study and record time, motion, method, and speed involved in performance of production, maintenance, and other worker operations for such purposes as establishing standard production rates or improving efficiency.

Tasks

  • Studies time, motion, methods, and speed involved in maintenance, production, and other operations to establish standard production rate and improve efficiency.
  • Observes workers operating equipment or performing tasks to determine time involved and fatigue rate, using timing devices.
  • Prepares charts, graphs, and diagrams to illustrate workflow, routing, floor layouts, material handling, and machine utilization.
  • Recommends revision to methods of operation, material handling, equipment layout, or other changes to increase production or improve standards.
  • Records test data, applying statistical quality control procedures.
  • Observes worker using equipment to verify that equipment is being operated and maintained according to quality assurance standards.
  • Recommends modifications to existing quality or production standards to achieve optimum quality within limits of equipment capability.
  • Evaluates data and writes reports to validate or indicate deviations from existing standards.
  • Aids in planning work assignments in accordance with worker performance, machine capacity, production schedules, and anticipated delays.
  • Prepares graphs or charts of data or enters data into computer for analysis.


Knowledge

  • Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.


Skills

  • Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
  • Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
  • Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.


Abilities

  • The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly.
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.
  • The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.


Work Activities

  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
  • Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.
  • Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
  • Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.
  • Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.


Interests

  • Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.