National Masonry Instructors Association

P.O. Box 669
Stevensville, MD 21666
Phone: 443-496-0132       Cell: 803-308-0931
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Instructor

Teach or instruct students. Can include industrial, commercial and government training instructors; and adult education teachers and instructors who prepare persons to operate industrial machinery and equipment and transportation and communications equipment. Teaching may take place in public or private schools whose primary business is education or in a school associated with an organization whose primary business is other than education.

Tasks

  • Conducts on-the-job training, classes, or training sessions to teach and demonstrate principles, techniques, procedures, or methods of designated subjects.
  • Presents lectures and conducts discussions to increase students' knowledge and competence, using visual aids, such as graphs, charts, videotapes, and slides.
  • Observes and evaluates students' work to determine progress, provide feedback, and make suggestions for improvement.
  • Plans course content and method of instruction.
  • Prepares outline of instructional program and training schedule and establishes course goals.
  • Selects and assembles books, materials, supplies and equipment for training, courses or projects.
  • Administers oral, written, or performance tests to measure progress and to evaluate effectiveness of training.
  • Determines training needs of students or workers.
  • Corrects, grades, and comments on lesson assignments.
  • Develops teaching aids, such as instructional software, multimedia visual aids, computer tutorials, or study materials for instruction in vocational or occupational subjects.


Knowledge

  • Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.


Skills

  • Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Teaching others how to do something.
  • Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.
  • Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.


Abilities

  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly.
  • The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a topic (the number of ideas is important, not their quality, correctness, or creativity).
  • The ability to focus on a single source of sound in the presence of other distracting sounds.


Work Activities

  • Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.
  • Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.
  • Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.
  • Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Establishing long-range objectives and specifying the strategies and actions to achieve them.
  • Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.
  • Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.
  • Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.


Interests

  • Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.